Seeking Alumni Input on SLIS Name Change

Greetings SLIS Friends and Alumni,

Posted below you will find a copy of a letter from Dr. Fred Roper, Jack Bryan, and myself requesting input on a new name for the School of Library and Information Science. Many of you will be receiving this letter in the mail, but I wanted to make sure it was distributed as broadly as possible.

I hope you will take the time to read the letter and share your ideas. (you can download the original PDF here).

SLIS Town Halls

Greetings friends of the School of Library and Information Science,

I’ll be hosting two virtual town halls to talk about current initiatives in the school. These include a new core curriculum for the MLIS, development of a new graduate program in Data and Strategic Communications, and major revisions to our Certificate of Graduate Study where we are looking for all of our incoming grad students graduating with both an MLIS and a certificate of specialization for no additional tuition or classes.

We also have a BIG birthday coming up. 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of the library science program at the University of South Carolina!

We would like your ideas on celebrating. This includes feedback on the renaming of the school. While the master’s degree will remain the same we are looking for a name to expand upon the fantastic foundation of the school’s half century of innovation to support not only librarians, but the bankers, principals, provosts, and communities librarians serve.

Thank you all who participated in the Town Halls. The recordings of the sessions are below.

SLIS Town Hall 1 
Thu, Oct 3, 2019 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT 
RECORDING

and

SLIS Town Hall 2 
Tue, Oct 15, 2019 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT 

 _____________________________

R. David Lankes, Ph.D.

The Atlas of New Librarianship is going Open!

I am so excited that working with the great folks at MIT Press, we are making The Atlas of New Librarianship available online for free under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International). The physical book will still available through MIT Press.

Since the Atlas was first published in 2011 it has won the 2012 ABC-CLIO/Greenwood Award for the Best Book in Library Literature, been adopted as a text book, and generated numerous conversations (and let’s be honest, arguments) around the world.

The Atlas was the first in a loose trilogy of books focused on the role of librarians and libraries in communities and centered on knowledge. Expect More was written for supporters of libraries from board members to provosts to community members. The New Librarianship Field Guide, also published by MIT Press, was written as a text book for library students and people looking for a more linear introduction to New Librarianship.

We hope by making the Atlas free online we can expand the conversation on the value and future of the profession internationally.

Ready to download? Here’s the new page for the book with download option.

Expect More Second Edition Now Free to Download

There has been a lot of interest and use of my book Expect More globally. In 2015 Expect More was updated into a second edition with the support of some fabulous library partners. Today we’re making this new edition freely available to download. You can still purchase paper copies of the print book.

In addition to the free online text (and links to translated versions) I have put together a series of videos talking about using each chapter in the context of community conversations.

A VERY big thank you to the partners who made this possible:

Lead Library Partners

  • Cuyahoga County Public Library (Ohio)
  • The Northeast Kansas Library System
  • RAILS (Reaching Across Illinois Library System)

Library Partners

  • New York State Library
  • ILEAD USA
  • Maine State Library
  • Topeka Public Library (Kansas)
  • Chattanooga Public Library (Tennessee)
  • Fairfield Public Library (Connecticut)
  • Enoch Pratt Free Library (Maryland)
  • F. Franklin Moon Memorial Library, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
  • The Califa Library Group
  • Fayetteville Free Library (New York)
  • State Library of Pennsylvania
  • Toronto Public Library
  • California Library Association

Commercial Partners

  • Tech Logic

Education Partner

  • Syracuse University iSchool
  • Dominican University’s School of Information Studies
  • University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Science.

Lankes to join the University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Science as Director

SLISI am very pleased to announce that I will be joining the University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Science as director and associate dean in the College of Information and Communications. My appointment will take effect July 1, 2016 subject to the university’s approval process.

I make this move with a great deal of excitement, and a healthy dose of sadness. I have been affiliated with SU for nearly 28 years in one capacity or another but now is the time for me to apply what I have learned in a new environment.

While there will be more details to follow, I did want to say that it has been the greatest honor and privilege to be part of the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University. I also want to extend my thanks to the faculty, staff, and students at SLIS and the College of Information and Communications who have been so welcoming and supportive.

Expect More 2nd Edition Now Available

Full cover
Click for Full Size Conver

The Second Edition of Expect More: Demanding Better Libraries For Today’s Complex World is now available for purchase (Expect More Collaboratory Members receive free copies).

You can purchase it from:

Paperback:

CreateSpace Online Store (preferred) and Amazon

eBook:

Amazon

If you are interested in bulk discounts please contact me at rilandpub@gmail.com

Thanks to all the Collaboratory partners for their help. Keep an eye out for Greater Expectations, the Expect More Workbook for engaging your community in conversations.


 

Here is a brief Changelog to highlight major changes:

Introduction
  • Changed the acknowledgements to recognize Expect More Collaboratory partners
Chapter 1
  • Revised estimated expenditures of libraries in North America and Globally. First edition grossly underestimated them.
  • Added OCLC examples of library usage.
  • Added Ferguson, Calgary, an NYC examples
Chapter 2
  • Added “Third Space” as a core argument for libraries.
    • Included examples like Toronto’s study pods and Fairfield’s treehouse themed children’s library.
  • Updated journal and database figures
  • Added Canadian statistics for literacy
  • Added StoryCorp and DPLA examples for Cultural Heritage
  • Added Toronto, Cuyahoga, and DC examples of supporting entrepreneurs
Chapter 3
  • Updated a lot of URL’s and mission statements.
Chapter 4
  • Added more examples in the training section
  • Added the Lebanon, NH Tor case as an example of protecting intellectual safety.
Chapter 5
  • Added discussion of how communities must share limited resources and how that can lead to conflict.
  • Added a discussion of hot spot lending
Chapter 6
  • Updated examples
  • Incorporated Aspen Report’s People, Platform, Place
  • Added section on the Community as Collection