“Reference in Academic Libraries: Virtual Reference” OCULA Spring Workshop, Toronto, ON, Canada

Slides and handouts for the workshop are now online at:

/rdlankes/Presentations/2006/Toronto.pdf

Here’s the abstract:

On day one join David Lankes as he looks at current issues and themes in digital or virtual reference. Libraries are taking reference to the web and this is creating challenges for librarians in terms of new skills, staffing requirements, and budget demands. This workshop will cover the basics of virtual reference, virtual reference tools, current trends and a little crystal ball gazing into the virtual reference future.

Reference in Academic Libraries: Virtual Reference

“Reference in Academic Libraries: Virtual Reference” OCULA Spring Workshop, Toronto, ON, Canada

Abstract: On day one join David Lankes as he looks at current issues and themes in digital or virtual reference. Libraries are taking reference to the web and this is creating challenges for librarians in terms of new skills, staffing requirements, and budget demands. This workshop will cover the basics of virtual reference, virtual reference tools, current trends and a little crystal ball gazing into the virtual reference future.
Slides: https://secureservercdn.net/50.62.174.113/61c.5b7.myftpupload.com/rdlankes/Presentations/2006/Toronto.pdf

Reference Authoring

“Reference Authoring” School of Information’s iForum, University of Texas, Austin, TX
Wednesday, February 8th, 2006

Abstract: Digital reference is not just reference interviews online. The main difference is the production of a “reference artifact.” In face-to-face reference, work must be done to retain the transaction (it must be recorded, or written down…action must occur), whereas in digital reference the opposite is true (the e-mail must be deleted, the database purged). This may seem like a small difference at first, but it is critical. With recorded transactions knowledge bases can be created, pathfinders authored, training can occur with real data, etc. This use of digital reference output is called reference authoring. This presentation will explore reference authoring, the use of induction and complexity research to manage knowledge created through reference authoring and the increasing intersection between reference and information retrieval.
Slides: https://secureservercdn.net/50.62.174.113/61c.5b7.myftpupload.com/rdlankes/Presentations/2006/RefA.pdf

“Reference Authoring” School of Information’s iForum, University of Texas, Austin, TX

Slides now available:

Digital reference is not just reference interviews online. The main difference is the production of a â??reference artifact.â?? In face-to-face reference, work must be done to retain the transaction (it must be recorded, or written down…action must occur), whereas in digital reference the opposite is true (the e-mail must be deleted, the database purged). This may seem like a small difference at first, but it is critical. With recorded transactions knowledge bases can be created, pathfinders authored, training can occur with real data, etc. This use of digital reference output is called reference authoring. This presentation will explore reference authoring, the use of induction and complexity research to manage knowledge created through reference authoring and the increasing intersection between reference and information retrieval.