I’m Looking for Doctoral Students

Come study with me…come help me change the world. Below is the recruitment announcement for Syracuse’s Ph.D. program. I am looking for good folks to come and work with me. It is increasingly vital that we have information scientists and new faculty in the field. Let me know if you are interested. I’d love to talk.


Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies welcomes applicants for our doctoral program. Admitted students are assured of at least four year’s funding (including summers) along with tuition and other support.

The interdisciplinary nature of our program is visible through the backgrounds of the 30 current doctoral students.  These students hail from ten countries and have academic training in the social sciences, communications, business, computer science, librarianship, linguistics, information science, and others areas.   Our doctoral program is a welcoming and inclusive place for scholars from under-represented populations, something we see as a defining element of our program.

Doctoral students pursue individualized course plans that are tuned to their particular research interests and needs.  This means advising and, more importantly, close working relationships with faculty members is a cornerstone of the Syracuse University iSchool Ph.D. program. This is why it is both residential and full-time.

We celebrate the success of our recent graduates who are taking up tenure-track positions in premier research institutions and exceptional liberal arts colleges, excelling in academic and policy think tanks, and pursuing entrepreneurial success! Current students are earning awards for their publications and dissertation work, continuing a long tradition of such recognition.

For 2016, we are particularly interested in speaking with applicants and seeing applications from those whose interests align with one or more of the following research areas

  • Text and data mining, Natural Language Processing and Information Retrieval
  • Computational social science, visualization, and data analytics
  • Agent-based modeling
  • Information policy, Internet governance, and telecommunications policy
  • Librarianship
  • Mobile computing
  • Data infrastructure and services in support of research
  • Organizational impacts of ICTs (e.g., Citizen Science, FLOSS, Wikipedia, mobile work, distributed scientific collaboration, and infrastructure studies)
  • Information security and privacy
  • Social computing, social media, social networks, and crowdsourcing
  • Wireless telecommunications policy and telecommunication service markets

You can learn more about the Syracuse iSchool faculty and interests at https://ischool.syr.edu/research/faculty-research-areas/

You can learn more about the doctoral program and application (due 3 January, 2016) at https://ischool.syr.edu/academics/graduate/doctoral/information-science-and-technology/

Please reach out to the faculty member whose interests draw you forward, the program director, Steve Sawyer, at ssawyer@syr.edu , or our program manager, Jennifer Barclay, at istphd@syr.edu with questions!

Expect More Scholarship Information Session

Info Session graphic

On Tuesday, February 17 at 7pm EST we are hosting a special information session to talk about the Expect More Library Scholarship and our LIS and LIS School Media programs.

iSchool Professor Dave Lankes will be talking about the Expect More Scholarship and the kind of opportunities Expect More Library Scholars will experience. We’ll be joined by current LIS student, Ryan Perry and the iGrad team.

Here is the link to sign up for this, as well as other online information sessions:

http://ischool.syr.edu/contact/forms/grad-onlinechat.aspx

Expect More on issuu.com

So I am experimenting with more self-publishing platforms. Today is issuu.com. This is the free version of the tool, so there will be adds, but you can use this to embed the book in any webpage you’d like:

Special Note: Don’t use the “Order Print” option, as print copies are cheaper through Amazon (and, you know, I get a royalty there).

This is a nice platform to keep formatting and visuals. However, you have to spend monthly money to add features such as annotations. Medium.com seems a better system for getting out pieces for reading and comment.

Announcing the Expect More Library Scholarship!

The Syracuse University School of Information Studies (iSchool) is excited to announce the Expect More Library Scholarship, a new scholarship program for students interested in pursuing their MS in Library and Information Science (LIS) or MS in Library and Information Science: School Media (LISSM).

The Expect More Library Scholarship is for students who want an intense but highly rewarding academic graduate program experience at the iSchool. We are able to offer this scholarship due to a generous donation from our library alumna, Estelle Wilhelm.

Expect More Library Scholars receive:

  • A 50% tuition award
  • Pairing with a specific faculty mentor, who is carefully matched to the student’s career field of interest, for the two years of the graduate education program
  • A paid faculty assistant position working directly with their faculty mentor on projects in the Expect More Library Scholar’s field of interest. The position is 20 hours per week during the academic year, for the two years of the program
  • A $1,000 travel fund for library conferences, industry networking events, and professional development activities

How to Apply for the Expect More Library Scholarship Program

To be considered for the Expect More Library Scholarship Program:

  1. You must first apply to either our LIS or LISSM program. This generates your Syracuse University ID number, which you will need in order to apply to the Expect More Library Scholarship. Be sure to leave yourself time!
  2. Once you receive your confirmation of application email from Syracuse University, complete the Expect More Library Scholarship application by March 1, 2015.

Apply to the LIS program >> | Apply to the LISSM program >>

About our Library Programs

At the Syracuse University iSchool we offer two master’s programs focused on library science, available both on campus and online:

The MS in Library and Information Science (LIS) is a comprehensive, American Library Association-accredited, 36-credit degree program that prepares you for a career in a broad range of organizations, including: an academic institution, public library, corporation, government agency or cultural institution.

The MS in Library and Information Science: School Media (LISSM) program focuses on teaching Library and Information Science (LIS) students the skills to instruct children in grades pre-K through 12 in all areas of literacy and technology fluency. LISSM students do not need to take additional education courses, as the New York State Department of Education requirements are infused into our curriculum.

Today. Today. Today.

This semester I am teaching a class in self-publishing (Publish or Perish: From Monks to MOOCs). This post is the result of my most recent self-published book, The Boring Patient.

There are a lot of reasons folks self-publish a book. Some for fame, some for money, some because they have something they want to share. In most cases it is a combination of all of these. Throw in the increasing ease of doing it yourself versus the difficulty of breaking into “traditional” publishing with agents and such and you have the amazing increase in self-publishing.

I’ll be honest, when I published The Boring Patient I was interested in selling books and making money in addition to simply wanting to share my message. It was nice to have a pretty paper book to give out to friends and family, but somewhat discouraging when I didn’t sell thousands of copies (yet). Then I was invited to do an interview on the book for a locally produced public radio show on health matters.

The interview was recorded (you can hear it here) in the same hospital where I had been diagnosed with and treated for my cancer. After the interview I went up to the oncology and bone marrow transplant ward. I had spent 25 days in the transplant ward walking 31 miles 42 steps at a time. I saw a nurse who remembered me. She have me a hug, and I gave her a book. Then I went to the general oncology ward where I had spent a month when first diagnosed.

As I turned the corner, a nurse I mentioned in the book saw me. This is the passage about her from the book:

Here is one of the most poignant moments I have had in my life, and frankly, if you take nothing out of this book but the following story, I would be very happy. As the fellow lowered the bed for more leverage to push into my skeleton she requested a steel needle to bore into the crown of my pelvic bone. A nurse who had been taking care of me came to the head of the bed, and with one hand gave the fellow the steel needle, and with the other took my hand.

For the next 10 minutes that nurse asked me about my job, my kids, my wife, where I liked to travel, anything to keep me talking. Meanwhile the fellow continued to lower the bed for better leverage. She was getting direction from another doctor…it was the fellow’s first bone biopsy – great. As soon as the fellow removed the needle, the nurse let go of my hand, walked down to the lounge where my wife was losing it, and told her, “You are planning his funeral, stop it.”

Now here she was, and before I knew what to say she hugged me. She proceeded to tell me that she not only heard about my book, but had given it to the head of medicine, her fellow nurses, and even patients. She asked if I would be willing to talk to patients and possibly be involved in some staff development. To say that she made my day is an understatement. I told her I was at her disposal. If she needed me to talk to nurses or patients or doctors, I would be there. It would be a pleasure to give back.

As I was leaving the floor, she found me again and asked if I had time to talk to a patient. So I was soon sitting next to – well – me really. Me from twelve months ago. Hair gone to chemo, port connected to a pole pumping in chemo. We talked for the better part of an hour about cancer, stem cell transplants, chemo, pain, family, drugs, dying, and getting through it all. After the better part of an hour I left. What hit me at that moment was that if I didn’t sell another copy of the book, it had already accomplished more than I could have hoped.

Which brings me to this post. Turns out my story has been used in an Italian course on “The Sociology of Health” (Google translation). I wrote a brief post for the class and received these questions:

Good evening, it’s a pleasure to talk to you. I have two questions.
How has this experience of disease changed your life? And how the narratives clinics can change the concept of care of and public health? Thank you for your availability.

That is not a set of answers I can easily squeeze into a Facebook comment. So with that very long preface, here are my answers:

On the matter of what clinics can change around the concept of public health, I think the short answer is that clinics don’t make you healthy. Doctors, drugs, and treatments don’t make you healthy…they are a crucial PART of your health. So, however, are you. It takes a team of committed professionals, patients, and caregivers to get and stay healthy. All members of that team are important, all must teach and learn from each other, and the key is knowledge. That nurse holding my hand was as important to my treatment as the steel spike piercing my bone. Me taking my pills was as crucial as the doctors writing the prescription, and the pharmacist who ensured the correct dosage.

How has this experience of disease changed my life? Wow. There are the expected answers. I have come to appreciate my family and friends more. I have seen how powerful the caring and contributions of even remote acquaintances can be. Meals, sitting with me, lottery cards, Christmas caroling form library students via Facetime, all can be overwhelming. They show that people care that you are alive.

Then there is the more truthful, and frankly painfully personal answer. I don’t know yet.

It has been nearly a year since my bone marrow transplant. While I was living that year it felt like a straight path of recovery. Every day feeling better than the day before. Every day stronger. Now I can leave the hospital, now I can leave the house. Now I can travel by car, now by plane. A first clean PET scan, then another, and another. Always getting better; always moving forward. That’s the way health is supposed to work. You get sick, then you get treated, then you get better. It certainly seemed like a straight line at the time. Feeling better, then joyous, then more work and more impact; always forward. Always joyous.

But looking back on my “first year” I do not see a straight path. Yes there is the forward path of my body, but all around it is the sometimes jarring emotional swerves and bucks and skids. Always joyous? Joyous and relieved and then depressed and lost. Is it my mind, my body or the latest drug side effect. Always forward always forward until you stop and breath and want to crawl back into bed for no reason. No reason. But you try and find one to explain the fear and anxiety and depression when yesterday was joy. You take out your mental checklist: Drug change? Insomnia (again)? Bad food? Am I sick – oh God am I sick?! Where’s the thermometer. How’s my breathing and my chest? There has to be a reason, it has to be physical right? I don’t get anxious, I don’t get depressed. I’m the brave one, the strong one, the cancer is gone. I’m better…right?

Then they are there. Your wife who hugs you. Your kids joke with you. Your friends and your mother are there. And it is not so bad. Sometimes it is still bad, but you force a smile, or a joke…and then you fool yourself too. Better. Out of bed. Then joy…thank God that in all that swerving and bucking, joy comes.

Today I am better. Today I have survived a year when many would have died. Today I have a chance for joy. Today I can have the straight path…or perhaps today I will once again skid and buck. But I can do that. And maybe today as I slide and skid I can also close my eyes to just feel the rush of wind on my face. And today as I look down and see hands that every day resemble more and more those of my dead father I can remember him. And today as I try something new I can applaud myself for courage – get out of bed – get out of the house – get out of my head and do the most sincere prayer I know: today I will make the world a better place. Today I will use my gift of life to help others. Today. Today. Today.

ILEAD USA and You

1260x240-ileadusa-banner1Right now 10 State Libraries are gearing up to offer, in my opinion, the best learning experience for in-the-field librarians: ILEAD USA. The program consists of cross-library teams, mentors, amazing instructors, and thought leaders from across the industry. Though 3 intensive residencies librarians form a cohort around projects with the sole aim to produce awesome librarians.

It is a program I feel some pride in as I was invited to be part of designing the curriculum. If you follow my blog you have seen some of my talks to ILEAD USA, but those are an itty bitty part of a much more amazing experience.

If you are in these states, and are looking for a professional development on steroids please contact your state library and see how you can participate:

These folks are also looking for awesome librarians to act as instructors in the area of technology, leadership, project planning, and community engagement.

Also, a special shout out to IMLS that has been instrumental in making this happen (with a lot of investment from the state libraries). Together this program has been creating and will continue to create a nationwide corp of librarians ready to improve lives. Please join us!

Publish or Perish: From Monks to MOOCs

Announcing IST600: Publish or Perish: From Monks to MOOCs, a new class I am putting together for next semester (on campus). It is meant for masters and doctoral students interested in the evolution of scholarly publishing. Here’s the description:

From academic librarians to independent consultants to doctoral students, information professionals have an amazing range of publishing options to use to build their reputation ands the reach of their ideas. This course will cover the practicalities of working with publishers, self-publishing including hands on projects, publishing apps, the evolution of the information publishing market, and disseminating ideas through MOOCs.

So if your looking for a 3 credit course for the spring, come join us Tuesday mornings 9:30 to 12:15. Also, if you’d like to share in person or via Skype (I’m looking at you journal and book editors) let me know.

Master Class Now Open for Enrollment

Starting at the end of June I’ll be running the New Librarianship Master Class (June 30-July 27). For those who are familiar with the MOOC I did last summer, this is a repeat of that course. For those unfamiliar, here is a description:

About the Class

Libraries have existed for millennia, but today the library field is searching for solid footing in an increasingly fragmented (and increasingly digital) information environment. What is librarianship when it is unmoored from cataloging, books, buildings, and committees?

The vision for a new librarianship must go beyond finding library-related uses for information technology and the Internet; it must provide a durable foundation for the field. New Librarianship recasts librarianship and library practice using the fundamental concept that knowledge is created though conversation. New librarians approach their work as facilitators of conversation; they seek to enrich, capture, store, and disseminate the conversations of their communities.

Join David Lankes for this online course that provides a foundation for practicing librarians and library science students in new librarianship. It builds on The Atlas of New Librarianship, the 2012 ABC CLIO/Greenwood Award for the Best Book in Library Literature and seeks to generate discussion about the future direction of the profession.

Course Introduction

For a brief video introduction see: https://vimeo.com/96621020

For a brief video introduction of New Librarianship see: https://vimeo.com/49680667

Join Others

Thanks to the generosity of the State Library of Illinois, the class will be open to all comers, but is targeting participants in the ILEAD USA project. To enroll, use the following instructions. Note that the class won’t start until June 30, but you can register now and get a sense of the course management system used.

Self Enroll

This course is being taught using CourseSites by Blackboard, an online platform for organizing and securely sharing course materials, online lectures, discussion and other learning activities. To request enrollment into my course, follow the steps below:

1. Launch a browser and enter the following URL to the course home page:

https://www.coursesites.com/s/_ILEADUSA

2. Once at the course home page, click the “Self Enroll” button.

When signing up, take note that you can register using existing account information from popular web services like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Gmail, Yahoo and Windows Live to make it easier to login.

Questions

If you have any questions please let me know at rdlankes@iis.syr.edu, or use the Discussion board under “Overview and Introduction.”